Waxing Destroys Your Skin – Upgrade to Laser Hair Removal

laser hair removalIf you’re waxing, you may not realize what your hair removal method is doing to your skin. Those bumps and irritations, while common, shouldn’t be an acceptable result of hair removal.

Many factors can affect the way your skin reacts to the procedure. Medications, creams, and even exfoliating can cause blemishes and infections. It might be time to ditch the wax and focus on a more permanent solution like laser hair removal, which is the only hair removal method proven to leave your skin flawlessly smooth for a lifetime. If you still aren’t convinced, here’s what waxing is doing to your skin.

Waxes Causes Burns

The most common result of waxing is redness and a burning sensation, most noticeable on sensitive areas such as the face. While a professional should know how hot the wax should be to reduce this risk, it isn’t always something they can control. For example, acne medications and skincare products that contain retinoid leave skin more susceptible to burning and peeling. Even oral medications such as antibiotics can make your skin more sensitive. This causes sensitive areas such as the upper lip, eyebrows, and chin to burn and peel after a wax treatment, making your face look like a disaster for days and even weeks afterward.

When you undergo laser hair removal, the laser targets hair pigment and damages the hair follicle enough to prevent hair from growing back. The laser will never leave you with burned or peeling skin. In fact, it gives your skin a flawless, smooth appearance.

Waxing Causes Ingrown Hairs

Waxing is designed to remove hair from the root, but it’s common for hair to break before the root can be extracted. These hairs are more likely to grow sideways or downward, causing infection and ingrown hairs. Waxing also weakens hair follicles, so even when hair is removed properly, it will have trouble breaking the surface. Exfoliating the skin helps hair make its way through your skin, but the infection still causes unsightly bumps and irritation.

For a flawless look, laser hair removal is the way to go. It’s the only hair removal method that destroys the hair follicles, eliminating the potential for ingrown hairs.

Waxing Causes Scars

Everyone has that friend who got severely burned from waxing and has the scar to prove it. Whether it was due to an inexperienced employee or an at-home waxing kit, you always think of her when you consider getting a wax. Even an experienced professional can cause scarring because repeated waxing causes chronic skin irritation.

Opting for a more permanent solution not only eliminates this risk, it will save you a lot of money in the future.

Waxing Causes Infections

Brazilian waxes are known for causing infections because they leave the skin vulnerable and raw. Pulling hairs will increase your risk of bacteria entering the skin and causing infections such as molluscum contagiosum, a skin infection that is common among children and wax clients. It’s caused from the aesthetician double-dipping the wax stick. This causes highly contagious bacteria, such as molluscum contagiosum, to enter the wax pot and infect clients. These red, pus-filled bumps are usually spread through skin contact, and they’re considered an STI when found on the genital area. Since this infection can spread by simply touching the infected area, everything from getting dressed to human contact becomes more difficult. It can take months for the infection to clear up.

Molluscum contagiosum isn’t the only infection that has been spread this way. There have been reports of women getting other STIs from double-dipping. When you undergo laser hair removal, you’re getting the results you want without putting your health at risk.

Body Details True Laser Hair and Tattoo Removal is the only company that offers a free lifetime guarantee. We have several locations throughout South Florida and convenient night and weekend hours, so be sure to schedule a free consultation now by calling 866-708-8645 or visiting http://www.bodydetails.com.